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[dropcap] A [/dropcap]avoid eating Fruit? This piece of advice is controversial as fruit has an almost magical health aura today. People may believe that fruit is nutritious but unfortunately fruit contains a lot of sugar – around 10% by weight (the rest is mostly water).

 

Dr. Gary Fettke is an Orthopaedic Surgeon practising in Launceston, Australia. Along with his wife Belinda, Gary has also opened the ‘Nutrition for Life – Diabetes and Health Research Centre’ based in Launceston which provides nutritional care around Tasmania and Australia.

 

 

Gary has a longstanding interest in the preventative aspects of health outcomes, particularly before operating on his patients. Recently an AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) investigation into Gary’s qualifications to give nutritional advice has concluded. This investigation (which lasted for more than two years) has resulted in Gary being issued a ‘caution’.

 

Avoid Eating Fruit?

Avoid eating Fruit? This piece of advice is controversial as fruit has an almost magical health aura today. People may believe that fruit is nutritious but unfortunately fruit contains a lot of sugar – around 10% by weight (the rest is mostly water). Just taste an orange or a grape. Five servings of fruit per day are equivalent to the amount of sugar in 16 ounces of soda (500 ml). Contrary to what many people believe, the sugar is more or less identical (about 50% glucose, 50% fructose).

 

Sugar from fruit can shut down fat burning. This can increase your hunger and slow your weight loss. For best results avoid fruit – or enjoy it occasionally as a treat. Exceptions to this rule are Tomatoes, Blueberries, Avocados, Cucumber, Olives & Nuts/Seeds.

 

Bottom line: Fruit is candy from nature.

 

Isn’t fruit natural?

Most people believe that fruit is natural, but today’s fruits in the grocery store have very little in common with what fruits looked like before they were cultured. There’s way more sugar in modern domesticated fruits. Excess sugar in general is bad for you, but there are differences between fructose and glucose, and not all of them are in favour of the former. Specifically, it is the effect of fructose on triglycerides that is of most concern, people who are pre-diabetic or who have a metabolic disease should really replace the fruit for vegetables.

 

Professor Grant Schofield is Professor of Public Health and Director of the Human Potential Centre at AUT Millenium in Auckland, New Zealand. Prof. Schofield’s research and teaching interests range from understanding and improving lifestyle behaviours (such as sleep, nutrition and physical activity), to wellbeing epidemiology and human performance.

 

Prof. Schofield currently leads a team of researchers investigating the role of insulin in the development of chronic disease and the feasibility of adherence to diets which are low in carbohydrate but high in fat. He has written a book called What the Fat? you can get it by clicking the link on the left.

 

 

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